The Nitty Gritty of Gritting

Earlier this week I read an article by The Sun that blew my mind. Gritting. Why have I not heard of this ‘mind-blowing’ facial cleansing method before? For those of you who haven’t yet been hit by the Reddit craze, ‘Gritting’ is a cleansing method that involves cleansing oil, clay masks, massages, and, well, blackheads. And it’s not for the faint hearted.

Untitled design (21)This cleansing method sees black ‘grits’ surface to the skin, that are all the dead skin cells, debris, and dirt that collects within the skin, creating blackheads. Supposedly, these grits are those blackheads coming to the surface of the skin. Gross, right? Yet some how I was still eager and excited to try it. It’s that gross slash fascination in skincare that you just can’t walk away from, and need to see for yourself. So I got to work.

How to Grit

BBFor this method you need two things. Cleansing oil, and a clay face mask. So I purchased Burt’s Bees facial cleansing oil, and some Aztec secret Indian healing facial clay  from Amazon Prime, and when I received them the same evening I rolled up my sleeves and got to work straight away (I was seriously excited)!

Firstly, your skin needs to be cleansed, so squirt some cleansing oil into your hands and gently massage the oil into your skin. After massaging your face for around one minute, wet your hands and massage the oil into your skin again for another minute, then rinse the oil off and pat your skin dry. The science behind cleansing oil is that it draws out all the bad oils in the skin which cause dirt and debris to collect causing blackheads and acne.

aztec secret clayNext, you need to apply your clay mask. To create my clay mask I needed to mix one Tbsp. of the Aztec Secret Indian Healing Clay with one Tbsp. of apple cider vinegar or water. I chose to go with water. After mixing the clay mask mixture, I applied the mask with the back of a table spoon, smoothing it onto my skin somewhat evenly, and onto my boyfriend’s skin who chose to skip the first stage of oil cleansing.

The mask feels super tight on the skin, and tingles quite a bit once it starts to dry, which is to be expected I guess as it is the worlds most powerful facial… right? Aztec clay masks contain the special ingredient Bentonite, which draws out positive charged contaminants within the skin, draws blood toward the surface of your skin allowing your skin to glow, and regulates the sebum within your skin, which are the glands that control how much oil disperses through your skin. It also helps heal acne, and encourages scars to disappear. Sounds great, right?

It’s important to note that the clay mask should be mixed thoroughly before application to avoid clumps, and be applied evenly to the skin so that you’re able to wash away the mask when the whole mask has dried evenly. The mask is a bugger to wash away, and leaving the mask on longer than needed is really uncomfortable and heavy on the skin – I speak from experience… Once the mask is washed off, the skin will feel sensitive, appear red, but will look and feel real smooth and fresh!

oilAs soon as I patted my face dry, I applied another squirt of cleansing oil into my hands and began massaging my face again.

Low and behold black grits appeared on the surface of my skin. They didn’t come in a troop of 1,000 but I definitely saw about five or six. Gross! Yet so fascinating. Are these blackheads? Are they grits from within my skin? Grits that are made up of dead skin cells, debris, and dirt are blackheads, so if that is what is resurfacing on my skin, then thats what they are. This method is absolutely mind-blowing. 

I wet my hands and continue to massage the oil into my skin, then wash it away. I’d like to describe my skin as smooth, but that just wouldn’t do it justice. My skin feels like silk – it has never been so luxuriously smooth. Where has this method been all my life?! My skin appears a little red and sensitive, which I found to be a little weird seeing as I have skin as thick and tough as a rhino’s. Over the next hour though, my skin appeared a little darker and glowing in tone, and felt a lot less sensitive. The only problem I had was trying not to touch my face too much. I was in awe.

Does it Work?

sensitive.jpg

This method seems incredibly effective and certainly my favourite cleansing method thus far. The oils work to loosen the keratin surrounding the blackheads that are rooted within the skin, and the clay works in pulling them out. Genius, huh?

However, with such abrasive methods, you must be cautious and sensible. Gently massage your face, never for longer than five minutes, and never using a tool. If you’re too rough with your skin, even with your fingers, you can break the capillaries in the skin, causing fine red lines to appear – the ones you may have seen in the crevice’s of the nose. You can also cause micro-cuts within the skin that can lead to inflammation, which can cause hyper-pigmentation at a later date – not ideal. Hyper-pigmentation is easily caused, particularly with darker skin tones, so sensitivity is key with this harsh cleansing method.

It’s also not the best idea to use this cleansing method more than once a fortnight. Dermatologists spend years training in developing effective cleansing treatments, that aren’t damaging to the skin. And although I’m in awe with this method, I wonder what negatives there are to this super cleansing method. Whilst oils work in extracting the ‘bad oils’, I’m not sure it’s such a great idea smothering oil on an acne prone skin, that’s already drenched in comedones. That said, I’ll definitely be using this method again in two weeks!

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